La Presse en parle

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La Presse en parle

Message  Alexis le Sam 16 Aoû - 8:38

Voici un article très interressant sur le festival annuel de Santa Cruz. (traduction dispo en bas du message)

lien : The Christan Science Monitor


They came, they saw, they chorused: At the 30th annual Saw Players Picnic & Music Festival, the ‘Chorus of the Saws’ features (l. to r.) Peter Hong, David Weiss, Curtis Chamberlain, and Terri Manning. (Jocelyn Wiener)

Players gather in the Santa Cruz Mountains to make music from saws
Devotees of the old art form – including everyone from college professors to vaudeville performers – produce a symphony of sounds that are at once Halloween eerie and songbird sweet.

As the evening light dies over a dusty parking lot in the Santa Cruz Mountains, a small group of musicians pick up their bows. They balance their saws between their knees, bend back the sharp, toothy blades, and produce a sound at once Halloween eerie and songbird sweet.

The 30th annual Saw Players Picnic & Music Festival – held each summer in this small northern California community – officially takes place on the second Sunday in August. But tradition has it that sawyers begin jamming the day before. They play their tools-cum-instruments in the parking lot until 1 or 2 a.m., then toss and turn for a couple of hours in the back seats of their cars.

The saw players, like their instruments, are an admittedly shy and quirky bunch. There’s a social worker from Minneapolis, a traveling vaudeville performer from the Czech Republic, a community college instructor from Seattle – all drawn together by their shared desire to extract a haunting whistle from a carpenter’s tool.

During much of the year, they practice the melancholy music alone in their basements, or play backup to the saw’s often louder, more popular brethren: the fiddle, the banjo, the guitar.

So, for the handful who have gathered for this pre-festival jam session, the night is a rare opportunity to trade tips, unite melodies, and bask in a shared adoration of the oft-overshadowed musical saw.

“More saw! More saw!” cries Morgan Cowin, the tall, white-haired president of the International Musical Saw Association, during one tune in which the instruments are being drowned out by a rowdy guitarist.

“More saw!” another player echoes.

The evening feels both awkward and affectionate, like a reunion of distant relatives. But there is a strange wonder to it, too, this group of musicians playing John Lennon and the Indigo Girls a few yards away from a green plastic Port-A-Potty. Beauty can emerge at the most improbable times and places, after all. The saw is a ready reminder of that.

•••

Sawyers like to say their instrument is easy to learn, but difficult to master. Players grip the saw’s handle between their legs, teeth pointing toward them. They produce notes by gliding a violin bow across the flat side while bending the blade into an S curve. Though beginners can often coax out only a squeaky warble, in the hands of the best, the saw sounds like a melancholy flute.

Most players say they were immediately struck by the saw’s peculiar sound – which Mr. Cowin believes was discovered by factory workers and carpenters in the 1700s or 1800s, before being widely popularized during the 1920s and ’30s in vaudeville.

“I was like, ‘You can play a song on this thing?’ ” says Jodi Golden-White, the community college instructor from Seattle.

Others came to it more gradually, after being put off by the instrument’s inherent weirdness. “I was like, ‘Oh my goodness, this is really strange,’ ” says Steve Cook, the social worker from Minneapolis. He’d shunned most of his father’s attempts to teach him the instrument, then picked it up after his father’s death.

Musicians here recognize the saw’s weirdness as much as anyone. References to ripped pants abound, and puns about “C-saws” and “sharp students” are plentiful. Although saw players tend to be shier than their guitar-playing counterparts, they can’t help but enjoy the impressed murmurs: You can make music out of that?

“Everybody and their brother plays guitar,” says Cowin. “Nobody plays the saw. If you’re a saw player, you’re immediately a star.”

As starlight punctuates the night sky on a Saturday, players gather in a small circle around a half dozen flickering tea lights. The mood is relaxed and cheerful.

Most old-timers, like Cowin, feel optimistic that the saw’s popularity will continue, even though one of the instrument’s greatest advocates, Charlie Blacklock, the founder of the Musical Saw Association, passed away this year. They cite the success of virtuosos such as David Weiss, whose playing is featured in the soundtracks of the 2000 film “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” and, more recently, in “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End.” Mr. Weiss, who spent three decades as principal oboist for the Los Angeles Philharmonic, plays a Stanley “handyman.”

Many new players, like Mariah Stricker, say the saw makes them feel like musicians for the first time in their lives. Ms. Stricker, who works in the plant-science department of the University of California, Davis, hadn’t played an instrument since middle school. Now she practices between two and five hours a day.

“The thing is, when the electricity finally goes out once and for all, saw is what everybody is going to be listening to,” quips Thomas Spearance, a sawyer from Fort Bragg, Calif.

Cowin has been flown to Japan and China to play the saw. Originally trained as a classical guitarist, he heard his first saw music while walking the streets of Copenhagen in 1968. Three years later, he bought his first kit (saw, violin bow, lessons, and case) for $39. He liked the saw’s simplicity and durability. What other instrument, he muses, can be used to stir a fire?

•••

On Sunday morning, after a late night of jamming, the sawyers rub sleep from their eyes, and traipse over a covered bridge onto the grounds of Roaring Camp Railroads. The camp is an assortment of old wood buildings, picnic tables, and steam trains designed to take visitors back to the 1880s. A group of mountain men is rendezvousing there for the weekend.

Blacklock’s relatives, who now run the Charlie Blacklock Musical Saws company, have set up a table to sell custom-made saws in lengths from 26 to 36 inches. Blacklock’s grandson, Kenny, wears an orange festival T-shirt advertising “Cutting Edge Music.”

Although Cowin estimates tens of thousands of people play the saw worldwide, this year’s festival has drawn only two dozen or so. Late Sunday morning, audience members are treated to a “Saw Off” among six up-and-coming sawyers, a couple of whom suffer minor stage fright before performing. A young woman in flip-flops plays a multi-part rendition of “Hot Stuff.” A man with a red-and-white beard and feathered cap performs “Beautiful Brown Eyes.”

In the afternoon, Thomas Spearance climbs on stage and holds up his saw. The man who crafted this instrument, he tells the audience, has changed his life forever.

“This is Charlie’s festival,” Mr. Spearance says. “And Charlie is always going to be here.”

As he begins his haunting version of “Amazing Grace,” a gentle breeze lifts the unlikely music into the sky. Once he finishes, perhaps wishing to drive home the point, he stands up and balances his saw on his nose.

He gazes heavenward and shouts: “Make some music, children!”


That old saw: Curtis Chamberlain plays in the ‘Saw Off’ competition.[url=That old saw: Curtis Chamberlain plays in the ‘Saw Off’ competition.

LA TRADUCTION EST LA

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The Austin chronicles

Message  Alexis le Dim 9 Nov - 20:35

C'est un vieil article que j'ai retrouvé....
The Austin chronicles

Stanley's Stradivarius
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
By Jay Hardwig

JULY 20, 1998: The sound of a musical saw is unlike that of any other instrument. It's a winsome, ethereal sound, a high quavery moan that crawls in through your ears and chews on parts of the brain you don't often use. It's a vibrating, pulsating splotch of noise, not unlike a will-o'-the-wisp, singing junebugs, or cats in pain. It's a little beautiful, a little creepy - an arcane voice from a time long past. "The saw has so much character to it," says Guy Forsyth, local bluesman, amateur folklorist, and nascent saw aficionado. "It can cry, it can scream. It's like a lot of folk instruments that really are doing their best to emulate the human voice, because that's the most natural sort of expression, and that's what the ear hears the easiest.

"That's why African-Americans in the South would nail a piece of baling wire on the barn, separated by two spools, and play it with a bottle, because you could get it to sing. You could get it to imitate your voice. You could get it to imitate the pentatonic scale, which is hard-wired in your head - which is the sound of a wolf in the darkness, which is the sound of a crying baby, which is the sound of laughter."

But not everyone likes the sound of the saw. It has been described as caterwauling, banshee-like, and even high frequency Jell-O. The Grove Dictionary of Music laments its "dismally whining effect," suggesting that it's only fit for vaudeville and novelty circuits. Olivier Giraud, guitarist for 81/2 Souvenirs and a sawyer in his own right, disagrees, calling the sound of the saw both haunting and pure.

"It's an instrument that really sets an atmosphere. It's like a mermaid. It's amazing. There's a mystery about it. You hear it once and don't forget it."

Magical or maddening, mermaid or banshee, the much-maligned musical saw has seen a local revival of late. Both Forsyth and Giraud have been playing it for a couple of years now, with their respective bands as well as with the Asylum Street Spankers, and recently Spanker and Jubilette Christina Marrs has taken it up also. Sawyer Beverly Wachtel once graced an Austin stage as part of a quartet featuring saw, banjo, bass, and didgeridoo, an instrumental amalgam not likely to be repeated elsewhere. There are doubtless others, sideline sawyers whose passion isn't as public as Forsyth, Wachtel, and Giraud's.

Played by running a bow over the vibrating, curved blade of a handsaw (the side without teeth), the saw's pitch is determined by the bend of the blade: a buckled saw sings high, while a (nearly) straight saw moans low. Volume is controlled by the force of the bow (the blade can also be struck with a mallet). Simple enough, on the face of it, but there are two critical refinements.

First, the curve of the blade must be an "S" curve, a double bend achieved by pushing the blade out with the thumb and pulling it back with the fingers. Holding the "S" curve is tiring, but essential.

"It requires a certain amount of wrist strength," says Forsyth. "Your practice time will be completely limited by how long until your hand gives out."

In addition to maintaining the "S" curve, a sawyer must keep the blade vibrating; it's these vibrations that allow the song to escape the saw. Most players create this "vibrato" by clutching the handle of the saw in their lap and lightly jiggling their legs. Too much vibrato and the saw sounds garish or maudlin, too little and the saw fails to sing. The saw is very sensitive, the good sawyer subtle.

"Even a heartbeat can make the note fluctuate," warns Giraud.

Olivier Giraud


A lot to keep in mind, but according to Giraud, once you get the knack, the saw is a simple instrument.

"It's very easy," he asserts. "It's so easy compared to guitar. Guitar is astronomically difficult. It's ridiculous how hard guitar is. In comparison, the saw is a dream. Once you know where [a note] is, you just hit it. There's not really a mistake possible."

Forsyth agrees.

"You don't need to have any sort of musical training to do it. It's just by ear. If you can hear a song, and you fool around on a saw, you'll find it eventually."

It's that simp- licity, one imagines, that made the saw a popular instrument in the first place. No one knows who first coaxed music from the blade of a saw, but it's likely he or she was not alone: There is evidence of the spontaneous generation of saw music on at least four continents going as far back as the early 1700s. One legend has it that a Pennsylvania Dutch lumberjack by the name of John Schmidt had a dream in which his favorite saw came to him with one request: "John, my back itches something awful. If you'll just scratch it, I'll hum some of the most beautiful music you've heard this side of heaven."

Popularization of the instrument is usually traced back to the vaudeville circuit of the early 20th century, and in particular to a traveling Missouri showman named Leon Weaver. Crossing the South with his "Weaver Brothers n' Elviry" act, Weaver is credited with spreading the good word of the musical saw, earning himself a place in the Ozarks Hall of Fame because of it. It was his sister-in-law, though, June Weaver, who made two critical innovations: First, she refined the "tremolo" effect by pioneering the lap-style of playing, allowing for more vibration; second, she was the first to lay down the mallet and pick up a violin bow, inventing the dismal whine we know and love today.

There were skeptics at first, doubting Thomases who insisted that performers were whistling their melodies rather than coaxing them from a saw: A Swedish sawyer named Martin Larrson was once forced to play under the bridges of Paris with a bun stuck in his mouth. Generally relegated to the vaudeville circuit, the music of the saw nevertheless found its way into some strange surroundings: country, blues, swing, and Japanese folk, to name a few. Marlene Dietrich, among others, played the musical saw, and saw hero Tom Scribner can boast sessions with Neil Young, George Harrison, Willie Nelson, and Muddy Waters. Scribner remains the only sawyer to have a statue cast in his honor; you can see it in Santa Cruz, California.

The saw's assault on the classical world was less successful. While music critic Lucille Fletcher predicted in her 1938 New Yorker article, "The Apotheosis of the Saw," that the saw would outgrow its vaudeville roots to become an accepted orchestral instrument, she has been proven less than prescient on that point. However, David Weiss did play a feature saw solo for the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1985, following with a medley of American popular music.

Over the years, the saw has gained loyal fans around the world, from the U.S. to Europe to Japan. The French call it la lame musicale or la lame sonore. The Germans call it die singende Sage. Americans call it the singing saw, the whispering foil, and the flexatone. No word on what the Japanese call it.

That's a lot of passion for an instrument you can get at Home Depot, as Giraud did when it came time to buy a saw of his own. He simply went down to Home Depot with his cello bow, sat down in the saw aisle, and tried out all the blades before settling on a 26-inch Stanley crosscut. Giraud reports that he did get some strange looks from "the old grandpas with the overalls."

Forsyth got his Stanley at Builder's Square, a point that brings him evident pride.

"The fact that it's a common saw is one of the great things about it," enthuses Forsyth. "I think there's so much beauty and poetry in making music from common objects, because it gets back to a place in musical expression when music was something people did for their own enjoyment. It wouldn't have been a $2,000 violin bow or the $3,000 handmade guitar. It would have been the $5 banjo you ordered by mail and hung up on a nail in the shed, because music wasn't a question of fashion. It wasn't anything other than this thing you did, sort of like scratching your back, for your own pleasure."

Plus they're easy to care for. While Beverly Wachtel carries hers in a hand-stitched, velvet-lined case, most saws require no such comfort. Giraud carries his in its original cardboard bladeguard, and when it comes time to clean it, he just whips out the old Scotch-Brite pad and gives it a scrubbing. And the saws do cut wood: Faced with non-believers, sawyers have been known to cut the legs off the chairs they are sitting in, and many a lumberjack played by night what he worked with by day.

This is not to say that a Stanley can't be improved upon: There are several companies that make specially crafted musical saws, many of which have blunted teeth or no teeth at all ("edentulous" is the technical term). Thinner and longer, they offer more flexibility and a larger musical range - up to three octaves, compared to just over an octave on a 26-inch handsaw.

The oldest name in the business is Mussehl & Westphal of Wisconsin, which sold upward of 30,000 musical saws a year in the Twenties and is still making them (although they've discontinued their Cadillac of saws, a jeweled, gold-plated blade that's now a collector's item). Austin's Breed & Company carries a Swedish Sandvik "Stradivarius" musical saw, which are factory-tested by a symphony violinist.

While Forsyth admits to a secret lust for the Stradivarius, Giraud is content with his Stanleys; he's worn out seven or eight of them in his three years of playing, replacing them when they are no longer flexible enough to get the high notes. If anyone has some carpentry work and wants to make an offer, Giraud says call him.

Eight saws in three years: This is not the work of a dilettante. This does not smack of novelty. Giraud is serious about the saw, and doesn't see why everyone else shouldn't be, too.

"I've never seen people laugh when I play the saw," says Giraud. "The melodies that you can get out of a saw are so accurate, so defined, that if someone plays it properly, it can be assimilated with regular musical instruments. I take it just as seriously [as guitar], because I enjoy it as much if not more."

Still, there's that nagging novelty tag, a deep-rooted disrespect for the saw as a serious musical instrument. Forsyth responds to the novelty charge more obliquely:

"There are some songs out there that just have to be played with two trashcans banged together, and nothing else. And if that's the song, that's what you need to play it with. And there are some songs that need a saw more than they need Steve Vai."

Forsyth gives the example of "Thibodeaux Furlough," a song he wrote specifically for the saw. He plays it for me. He's right. It doesn't need Steve Vai. In fact, it's the saw's humility that attracts Forsyth. The saw is a straightforward, honest instrument, utterly lacking in pretension.

"In this goofy little folk instrument, like in other goofy little folk instruments like the nose flute or the kazoo or the harmonica, there is ... incredible story, incredible irony, incredible history, texture, smells. I am able to hear in it nothing more than collective conscious and some sort of ghost thread of racial memory of the bloodline - a whole universe of sepia-toned history."

Collective conscious? Ghost thread of racial memory? A whole universe of sepia-toned history? Not bad for a holdout from the hardware aisle. Not bad at all.

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Re: La Presse en parle

Message  Alexis le Ven 12 Déc - 17:42



Il y a justement un membre du forum qui est en train de travailler sur le sujet... à suivre.

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Re: La Presse en parle

Message  Alexis le Dim 22 Mar - 16:46

vu sur : http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/Locales/Saint_Pol_sur_Ternoise/actualite/Autour_de_Saint_Pol_sur_Ternoise/Ternois_Ouest/2008/04/27/article_maurice-dalle-sa-scie-et-ses-bidons-face.shtml

Actualités - Ternois Ouest

Maurice Dalle, sa scie et ses bidons, face à des enfants ébahis
dimanche 27.04.2008, 05:38 - La Voix du Nord

| GAUCHIN-VERLOINGT |
Dans le cadre du Défi Internet, où il est demandé de mettre à l'honneur une figure locale, les enfants de l'école recevaient Maurice Dalle, jeudi après-midi.


Originaire du village, Maurice Dalle est un agriculteur à la retraite, avec une passion peu ordinaire. Dans les années soixante-dix, le musicien a connu ses heures de gloire et une carrière internationale grâce à sa scie musicale.
Sylvie Théry, directrice, a eu l'idée de le solliciter afin qu'il passe quelques heures avec les élèves. Ses démonstrations ont émerveillé les enfants. Le musicien a commencé par jouer de son instrument fétiche, la scie, avant de passer au jazoflûte, à la trompette à coulisse, ou au flexatone. De quoi laisser rêveur... Il a aussi invité les enfants à le rejoindre pour jouer avec lui. Maurice Dalle a terminé son intervention très remarquée par L'Hymne à la joie, le final de la 9e symphonie de Beethoven, qui est aussi l'hymne de l'Union européenne. Un morceau joué avec un violon fait d'un bidon d'huile et d'une canne à pêche pour archer. À n'en pas douter, les enfants se souviendront longtemps de cet après-midi un peu fou où un « vieux monsieur » a joué de la très belle musique avec presque rien... •

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Re: La Presse en parle

Message  Alexis le Dim 22 Mar - 16:50

vu sur: http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/Locales/Saint_Pol_sur_Ternoise/actualite/Autour_de_Saint_Pol_sur_Ternoise/Ternois_Est/2008/12/05/article_maurice-dalle-et-florian-leduc-reunis-po.shtml

Ternois Est

Maurice Dalle et Florian Leduc réunis pour un concert pas comme les autres.
vendredi 05.12.2008, 04:48 - La Voix du Nord
Maurice Dalle et Florian Leduc, les deux musiciens préparent un concert de scie musicale et de piano depuis plusieurs mois. | HERLIN-LE-SEC |

C'est un duo inédit et étonnant, qui se produira dimanche, à l'église d'Herlin, dans le cadre de la saison culturelle de l'association intercommunale Sillons de culture. Maurice Dalle sera en effet associé à Florian Leduc, pour un concert de scie musicale et de piano tout à fait étonnant.

Le premier, Maurice Dalle, n'est plus à présenter dans le Landerneau musical. Quant au second, Florian Leduc, il commence à s'y faire un nom, dans ce Landerneau... Deux artistes, deux générations, deux styles, mais un amour commun : celui de la musique. Un amour qu'ils feront partager, dimanche après-midi, à l'église d'Herlin-le-Sec. Une église que connaît bien Florian Leduc. D'abord parce que le jeune homme habite la commune. Ensuite parce qu'il a déjà eu l'occasion de s'y produire. C'était en juin 2007, déjà à l'invitation de Sillons de culture. Lors de ce concert, l'association intercommunale avait invité Vladimir Soultanov, pianiste originaire d'Ouzbékistan. Mais avant d'écouter le musicien, le public avait pu découvrir le talent de Florian Leduc, élève de Vladimir Soultanov au sein de l'école de piano d'Arras. Cette fois, Florian Leduc ne jouera pas en première partie. ce dimanche, ce sera lui, « la » star. Ou plutôt l'une des deux stars.
Car il sera accompagné par Maurice Dalle. Un artiste qui fait régulièrement parler de lui, bien au-delà des frontières du Ternois. Originaire de la commune de Gauchin-Verloingt, l'artiste, agriculteur à la retraite, se passionne depuis des dizaines d'années pour la scie musicale.
La musique de « Michel Strogoff »
Une passion qui l'a amené sous les feux de la rampe, dès les années 70. À l'époque, il est contacté par le cinéaste Vladimir Cosma, qui lui propose de participer à l'interprétation de la musique du film Michel Strogoff.
En 1975, nouvelle consécration, puisque Maurice Dalle reçoit le Grand prix international du disque du ministère de la Culture. Invité à plusieurs reprises sur les plateaux de télévision et entre deux tournées, Maurice Dalle n'en oublie cependant pas sa région du Ternois. Ainsi, en avril dernier, il a partagé sa passion avec les écoliers de Gauchin, dans le cadre du Défi internet... Proche de son public, Maurice Dalle prépare, avec Florian Leduc, le concert de dimanche depuis plusieurs mois. Les deux musiciens sont deux perfectionnistes, et veulent proposer un moment unique aux mélomanes. Lors de ce concert, place à des oeuvres de Bach, Beethoven ou encore Mozart. De grands classiques pour un concert pas tout à fait comme les autres, pour nos deux Ternésiens
... t
> Concert dimanche, à 16 h, à l'église d'Herlin-le-Sec. Tarif : 6 euros (gratuit pour les scolaires). Renseignements sur www.framecourt.monclocher.com

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Victoires de la Musique Classique 2010

Message  Alexis le Sam 13 Fév - 20:51


Édition du mardi 9 février 2010

Montpellier. Les Victoires De La musique selon Shirley et Dino
Hier soir, aux Victoires de la musique classique, le duo comique a mis son grain de sel. Le féminin de maestro, pour Gilles, c'est "minestrone", à la grande joie de Corinne, qui apprécie. Le couple Benizio est revenu pour animer cette cérémonie avec leur King Arthur de Purcell à la sauce Shirley et Dino. Ils ont partagé leur numéro d'apprentis chef d'orchestre avec leur complice, Hervé Niquet, aussi classico que baroqueux et de surcroît délirant. L'orchestre de Montpellier y a mis du sien... Ce couple uni par le rire a apprécié la performance de Ludovic Nicot à la scie musicale, sur le plateau en même temps qu'eux. « Formidable, déclare Dino. Avant, je ne connaissais que Boubouche, un gars de la rue. Il avait une vraie scie achetée au BHV. » Tous deux l'avaient dit franchement, ils ne savaient pas grand-chose à la musique, et lorsque Hervé Niquet est venu les trouver après leur spectacle des Caméléons aux Bouffes parisiens, ils ont pensé que c'était un blagueur. Ils n'ont pas été moins surpris que René Koering soit partant : « C'est quelqu'un de formidablement cultivé mais il aime les coups de poker, les actes d'éclat, les petites révolutions. » Pour eux, King Arthur a été « une aventure formidable ».
Décisive aussi. Ils vont faire un Carnaval des animaux pour Noël 2010, sur un nouveau texte (pas celui de Francis Blanche). Et surtout ils songent déjà avec gourmandise à La Belle Hélène d'Offenbach, qu'ils mettront en scène à Montpellier pour Noël 2011. « On écoute tout, on aime tout, s'exclame Shirley . Maintenant, on se plonge dans l'opérette. Mais on ne va pas contre la culture, on aime la dérision, l'humour. » En attendant tous les mots en "h" et en "y", les chlamydes et les psychés, et les cothurnes où frétilleront les doigts de pied, le couple passe en tournée à Montpellier les 16, 17, 18 avril.


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Une "scie" invitée aux Victoires de la musique Classique 2010

Message  Alexis le Sam 13 Fév - 20:54


Édition du lundi 8 février 2010

Montpellier. Répétition Une "scie" invitée aux Victoires
En répétition, hier, le programme des "Victoires de la Musique" était en partie montpelliérain, et il n'y avait pas que l'Orchestre mobilisé avec son chef Lawrence Foster. Hervé Niquet demandait aux musiciens « de l'insolence ! » Il mettait au point avec Shirley et Dino (en bas à droite) un intermède comique autour de la Joyeuse marche de Chabrier : ou "comment devenir maestro"... Ils font aussi ensemble une irrésistible tyrolienne dans King Arthur .
Pour partager le délire, les instruments "oubliés", remarqués aux 30 ans de l'orchestre, reviennent en trio. Isabelle Toutain à la harpe et Jacques Descamps au cor des Alpes accompagnent le violoniste Ludovic Nicot, vedette clownesque de la scie musicale.Les chanteurs d'"Opéra Junior" sont là aussi, troupe fringante aux couleurs vives. Plus de 40 choristes, petits et grands réunis, pour une superbe Pavane de Fauré.
L'Opéra Berlioz est transformé en plateau télé, où les acteurs montpelliérains vivent un grand moment. À partager sur France 3, ce soir, à 20 h 35.

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Re: La Presse en parle

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